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Veggie Skeletons

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Wouldn't it be fun if just once you could say "Honey please play with your food"?

Well....YOU CAN and they can learn a lot from the experience.

Just yesterday my son reminded me of the time we made skeletons out of fruits and veggies. In the past we did it to review Spanish body parts vocabulary. I began to think about all the possibilities.

* You can use this activity to introduce the concept of adjectives.

* You can teach body parts vocabulary in another language.

* This makes for a fun "edible art" project.

* You can use this activity for thinking skills for preschoolers in a compare/contrast way.

* This is a nice opportunity to count with preschoolers. How many limbs does it have? How many carrots have you used? How many green things have you used in this project?

There really isn't a wrong way to do this activity. Simply gather your ingredients and wash, peel or cut as necessary. Set up each child at the table with an ample supply of veggies and fruits. Give plenty of time for creating and discussion. Have dip on hand for snack time :-)

Suggested Foods

Large Mushrooms for the head itself
Grapes - eyes
Cucumber slices - eyes, knees, shoulders
Raisins - eyes
Crackers - eyes, knees, shoulders
Carrot or Celery Sticks - legs, arms
Grape Tomatoes - eyes
Pepper Slices - ribs
Apple Slices - ears, mouth [brush with lemon juice or sprite to keep from browning]
Pineapple Pieces - eyes, hands, fingers
Mandarin Orange Slices or Tangerines - ribs, fingers, knees, elbows, shoulders, eyebrows
Coconut Flakes - eyelashes
Snap Peas - fingers
Broccoli or Cauliflower - hair
Radishes, sliced or whole
Squash or Zuchini sliced into circles or strips
The whites of hardboiled eggs

For my kids the most important thing is to give them time to create. I think this activity is most educational when I make myself available to hear what THEY have to say about their creation. I don't want to interfere in their creative process at all. I'm there to provide terminology, when appropriate, and ask the right questions.

 

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